Friday, 21 August 2009

OverRated: The Yellow Brick Road

The Wizard of Oz was a huge part of my childhood. It was certainly on the television every Christmas, if not every seasonal celebration and I fear I started to mould my life upon it.

Like the Lion, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man, I thought that if I could just reach... well, the next level in whatever I was doing, I would achieve the goal I sought. Be it courage, a brain, a heart... or just someone who would appreciate all my finer points and learn how to love all the crap that came with them.

The opening piano chords of Elton John's famous song inevitably bring a lump to my throat and tears to my eyes because it always made me think about saying goodbye to that dream. Somehow, so much more poignant than Candle in the Wind.

And, now I've done it. Turned off the path and away from the promise of the Emerald City with the Wizard who will wave his magic wand and make everything right. Taken my life into my own hands.

I may not be like Elton's boy going back to hicksville from the glitz and glamour of a penthouse lifestyle but things will certainly be different from here on in. However, the afternoon that I spent with one of my more difficult children in my flat recently where we just chatted and hung out without any rows gives me hope that I can look forward to a better future.

Because I took the plunge and made it so, rather than waiting for things to miraculously come right through the wave of a magic wand.





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8 comments:

TROLL Y2K said...

Oz never did give nothing to the Tin Man, that he didn't, didn't already have.

From the archives of grammatically incorrect sappy lyrics.

Ben said...

SOunds like great progress with your children. I would not say this is unexpected. They were taking advantage of a dysfunctional situation. Now, they have a responsibility to help you in your new life. Best wishes, and I hope we can continue to read about your progress! BTW, this is also proof that your (I hope former) counselor was wrong when he told you to place some blame on your children. That would have poisoned the situation.

Joanna Cake said...

Hey Troll, Finally got around to the Troll Poll. Very interesting :)

Ben - Thank you and I agree about the whole Counsellor thing. He was very good for me and his focus was purely on ME. I had to start tempering his words with my own understanding of the characters involved in the situation. But Im glad it was like that. I wouldnt have wanted a situation to occur where I relied totally on his advice and took it as Gospel. That would have been something rather different to counselling, more like mindleading.

Fire Byrd said...

Hiya Miss Cake,
I haven't been here for a long time.
But I'm pleased to hear that you are moving forwards with your life.
Doing it alone with teenage kids is bloody tough anytime, but especially when you first start it alone.
Kids will suck you dry, all any of us can hope for it that one fine day they (and us)will come out of it and learn to get on together.
Good luck
xx

Joanna Cake said...

FB - Thank you x Although, to be fair, I dont think that much has changed in terms of my children having two parents. They will spend large amounts of time with both and, whilst their permanent beds remain with their father, they will spend equally as much time with me but under less pressured conditions and without his interference. In my home, we will co-exist under my rules.

Ro said...

D'you know, I've never seen the film. I did read the book once, as a curious twenty-something year old. Meh.

I can't say it inspired me to look for a wizard.

I'm pleased you've left the yellow brick road behind; off-roading is often a lot more demanding in some ways, but it's also a lot more satisfying!

Joanna Cake said...

Ro - I knew there was a reason that I missed my old 4x4 :)

Kevin Musgrove said...

Good that you're still feeling good about yourself and you're making progress with the children.

I have a constant abiding fear of that Wizard of Oz moment: some time, some day somebody will pull aside the curtain, point at me and say: "look! it was him all the time!"